Tuesday, April 22, 2014

Morzine! One of Europe's Best Apres Ski destinations

This might sound like an impossible task after a punishing day on the mountain, but the saving grace of après is that it usually releases you from its clinches at around 9pm – plenty of time to shake off the crimes from the night before and still hit first lifts.
Whether you’re looking for a few sophisticated Vin Chaudes in a French local or you want to stomp on the rule book and keep the party going ’til 4am, here’s our pick of the best European resorts for après
Read more at http://whitelines.com/travel/12-of-the-best-european-resorts-for-apres.html#DmFLe8eqMja5iJTz.99For many, Après has long been a legendary part of a snowboard trip. It normally lures you in around 4pm with a casual jug of beer and before you know it you’re knocking back the Jägers, dancing more enthusiastically than you thought yourself capable of to euro-pop and laughing in the faces of skiers as they attempt to clamber on tables in their silly boots.
This might sound like an impossible task after a punishing day on the mountain, but the saving grace of après is that it usually releases you from its clinches at around 9pm – plenty of time to shake off the crimes from the night before and still hit first lifts.
Whether you’re looking for a few sophisticated Vin Chaudes in a French local or you want to stomp on the rule book and keep the party going ’til 4am, here’s our pick of the best European resorts for après
Read more at http://whitelines.com/travel/12-of-the-best-european-resorts-for-apres.html#DmFLe8eqMja5iJTz.99


Thursday, April 10, 2014

Why late season skiing is best for families

 The Easter holidays are traditionally the last great hurrah of the ski season, and 2014’s Easter is very late: most UK schools break up today (April 4) and don’t return until Tuesday, April 22.`

For ski tour operators, this is a double-edged sword: on the one side, many families consider the ski season finished by mid-March, so a late Easter getaway to the slopes is usually replaced with a summer break. But the brave families who do decide to head out to Europe will be let in on the mountain's best kept secrets: late season is the absolute best time to take the family skiing. And here's why…

Sun worshipping
Contrary to popular belief, the snow does not melt after half term. Most ski resorts are open well into April - even the Pyrenean resorts such as Baqueira Beret, often thought of as Europe’s least snow sure areas - are open well into the third week of April, and many Alpine resorts carry on through to the beginning of May.
“Most people who come out around the end of the season,” says Rude Chalets owner Helen Lavender, “are families whose parents know their stuff - maybe ex-seasonaires, or instructors - and know that spring is the time when the best deals are on, and when the kids are going to have the best time in the sun.”  

See video/Read on...

Wednesday, March 19, 2014

Ski Club 2014 Part 1 – MORZINE

One good thing about getting older is the creation of traditions, and one which I have embraced whole heartidly is my annual ski club trip, which started years ago with a small trip with my university mates to Meribel, 7 years later the tradition has grown and I have just come back from biggest ski trip yet, 22 friends in one chalet in Morzine, France...Read on 20140318-151856.jpg,

Wednesday, March 5, 2014

How To Be A... Mountain Brewer

Chrigl Luthy brews beer in Morzine, France. Photo: Sam McMahonLet’s be honest – you’re never going to live a happier existence than when you’re a seasonnaire. You get to live in the mountains with a guaranteed group of friends, never-ending party scene and endless shredding. The only downside? The jobs. From cleaning floors to peeling potatoes, generally the work is, well, pretty shit. However, there are some lucky souls who land themselves dream seasonal jobs. Whitelines tell us some of the raddest jobs the mountains have to offer…..

Meet Chrigl Luthy – Brewer...Read on 

Let’s be honest – you’re never going to live a happier existence than when you’re a seasonnaire. You get to live in the mountains with a guaranteed group of friends, never-ending party scene and endless shredding. The only downside? The jobs. From cleaning floors to peeling potatoes, generally the work is, well, pretty shit. However, there are some lucky souls who land themselves dream seasonal jobs. This season we’re featuring some of the raddest jobs the mountains have to offer…..

Meet Chrigl Luthy – Brewer

JOB TITLE: Co-Owner and brew-master at the Bec Jaune Brewery in Morzine, France.
HOURS: Six days a week
PAY: TBC…
PERKS: I get to work with my favourite thing, beer! And I get to live in the mountains and ski when I want.
DOWNSIDE: Brewing is actually hard work; working and skiing every day makes you very tired…
Getting to brew beer after a day riding powder sure seems like the dream right? Can life really be that good? We spoke to Chrigl Luthy – co-owner of a new brewery/restaurant in Morzine, The Bec Jaune Brewey – to find out all about life as a mountain brew-master. After working in London for several years he made the plunge and moved to the Alps to pursue his true calling as a full time skier/brewer, here he is in his own words:

Read more at http://whitelines.com/features/interviews/how-to-be-a-mountain-brewer.html#XQRtCoRbdg52GhDX.99
BREWING BEER AND SKIING, MUST BE A TOUGH LIFE. FIND OUT MORE FROM CHRIGL LUTHY
Read more at http://whitelines.com/features/interviews/how-to-be-a-mountain-brewer.html#XQRtCoRbdg52GhDX.99

Saturday, March 1, 2014

British Ski Instructors Arrested in France

There's a war up in 'em hillsEarlier this week an English ski instructor, Simon Butler, was arrested in the French resort of Megève along with six of his employees, for allegedly teaching without the correct paperwork. The proceedings already appear to have ignited long-smoldering resentments between local and UK business owners in the French Alps.  Read on..
It’s quite hard to tell exactly what happened. Although The Daily Mail and Telegraph have both jumped on the story – gleaning quotes from excited UKIP politicians, Boris the Menace and the usual anti-EU brigade – there are so far no clues as to what documents the ski school was lacking or why precisely they were targeted.

Read more at http://whitelines.com/news/british-ski-instructors-arrested-in-france.html#SHmKYsP2BYADfUaT.99

Tuesday, February 25, 2014

Outdoor Retailer

TGR's new Digital Advertising Sales Manager, Jon Grinney, was gracious enough to tote along a camera to his meetings at last week's Outdoor Retailer tradeshow in Salt Lake City, and we made sure he took as many photos of next year's ski and snowboard gear as possible. Here's a host of shots of 2015 skis, snowboards, and other goods to oggle over that are presented in the following alphabetical order:  Read on..

Friday, February 21, 2014

Going to Olympics vs. staying home

by  stayorgo2
Olympic freeskiing events will be taking place in Sochi on February 11, 13, 18 and 20 and the idea of being there to experience the debut is quite alluring. To do that, you’d likely take a pricey 12-day Russian vacay. We ran some numbers to give you an idea of what it would cost to stand at the bottom of the pipe vs. sit on top of your couch for the big show.

Hit the Road:

Flight: You don’t go on vacation much, so treat yourself to a cushy seat up front. $8,573
Hotel: Egyptian cotton isn’t cheap but neither are you and anything less than 800 thread count is uncivilized. $5,676
Transportation: Gotta get your ass from the airport to the resort, near Krasnaya Polyana. $94
Event tickets (four events): Not only do you have to get there, then they charge you for tickets. The nerve! $453
Libations: We figure you’ll average 3.3 liters of beer per day, and a half-liter of vodka will compliment those nicely. $381
Bribes: According to a study by independent Russian research centers, the average bribe costs $178. We guess you’ll shell out about three of them. $534
Food: A generous amount of fast food offset by some beef stroganov and a little pelmeni. $663
Souvenirs: Ushanka (funny looking) fur hat, something with the Olympic rings and maybe a Vladimir Putin bobblehead. $150

Total: $16,524


Watch from Home:

Dranks: We’ll say a sixer of beer for each of the four events and the makings of your favorite one of Hank’s Dranks (we recommend the Mule). $61
Basic internet/cable package: They sell it monthly so start out your month with some trashy cable TV, watch all the skiing, a little bit of curling and then switch over to the Food Network. $35
Hot wings and pizza: To further separate yourself from these Olympic-caliber athletes, order the greasiest, most delicious delivery around. $69

Total: $165


Conclusion:

Stick Around: Sitting on your couch costs approximately one percent of what it would cost to go to the Olympics and you’ll probably get a better view.

*All costs and total values are approximations.