Friday, July 22, 2016

Skiing The Portes Du Soleil Circuit

The Portes du Soleil is one of the largest ski areas in the world with over 650km of marked pistes encompassing twelve resorts. It stretches between Mont Blanc and Lake Geneva, which creates a microclimate that is excellent for snowfall.

Jean Vuarnet was responsible for developing Avoriaz and then linking it to the surrounding resorts creating the Portes du Soleil ski area. The highest point in the area is 2466m and the lowest is at 1000m and there are more than 200 lifts linking the area, which stretches over 14 valleys. Luckily, for skiers and snowboarders who are keen to explore, most of the Portes du Soleil ski area can be reached in a single circuit. The circuit will take most average skiers and snowboarders a whole day to complete so first lifts are advised!

There are two directions the circuit can be skied; clockwise or counterclockwise. Completing the circuit counterclockwise could mean challenging La Chavanette otherwise known as The Swiss Wall or facing the getting the chairlift down. The Swiss Wall is classified as an orange, as it is considered too dangerous to even be a black. The wall should only be attempted if you are a very accomplished skier and are confident you can complete it safely. For this reason, we are taking a look at completing the circuit clockwise – a little bit more achievable for everyone!

There are many different ways of completing the Portes du Soleil circuit but here’s just one of our suggestions…
From Les Gets head up the Chavannes lift and follow signs to Morzine. Ski down the Pleney slope to the bottom where a bus stop is located. Take the petit train across town to the Super Morzine lift, take this up and then the Zore lift and follow the cat track to the Proclou lift, which will take you up to the top of the Lindaret bowl. From here ski down into the bowl - you can even stop to have a play in the famous Burton Stash park on the way down.

From Lindaret, take the Chaux Fleurie lift up and ski down to the bottom of the Plaine Dranse. Take the Chaux-des-Rosées chair up and ski down to Les Combes. Take this lift up and follow the long run down into Linga. From here you can again get the bus across the town of Châtel, to the Super Châtel lift.
If you are doing well for time, you could get the bus across to the Petit Châtel lift and take this followed by the Barbossine. From here ski down and take the Tronchay lift up. From here you can enjoy some great views across Lake Geneva towards Montreux before heading back towards the Super Châtel lift.

From the top of the Super Châtel, take the Chemillon and ski down to the bottom of the Le Corbeau. From here, you can take the bus across the town of Morgins to the Folleuse or it is actually also possible to walk there and take in the beautiful church.

Take the lift up and then ski to the Bochasses following signs for Champoussin. Ski to the bottom of the Aiguilles des Champeys and take the lift up then ski down to the bottom of the Pointe de L’Au, take this lift and then you can ski down into Les Crosets.

From Les Crosets, take the new Grande Conche lift and ski down to the bottom of the Cuboré, take this up and over lift into the Fornet area. Then ski back down into Avoriaz, take the Stade lift and ski down the Prodains home run.
Again take the A bus back into Morzine and take the Pleney bubble up, from here follow signs all the way into Les Gets. Then enjoy a drink before collapsing after a long days skiing - phew!

Sunday, July 17, 2016

Who Invented Snowboarding?

Who Invented Snowboarding? Not Jake Burton

By Michael Frank, Adventure Journal on June 7th, 2012
On Christmas Day, 1965, Muskegon, Michigan’s Sherman Poppen’s pregnant wife, Nancy, wanted their two daughters, Wendy and Laurie, to play outside so she could get some rest. When the girls were disappointed they couldn’t safely stand up in their sled to go down the snow-covered dunes in their backyard, Poppen fastened together a pair of kid’s skis and after some tweaking invented Muskegon’s most famous toy, the Snurfer. The rest, as they say, is history. By 1968 Muskegon was hosting the World Snurfing Classic, and Poppen licensed the Snurfer name to Brunswick, which sold over a million of the proto-snowboards by the early 1980s. And even though Poppen didn’t actually bother to take up snowboarding until he was in his late 60s, he’s still considered the father of the sport, honored by the Olympic Committee when snowboarding was inducted into the Games. Poppen is being honored by the Muskegon Chamber of Commerce at a ceremony this week. Via Transworld.
Read more stories like this at Adventure Journal.

Tuesday, July 12, 2016

13 Tips for Skiing with Kids

13 Tips for Skiing with Kids

Top kids' instructors share wisdom on making skiing fun for everyone in the family.
Family Week on SKIMag.com: Tips with skiing for kids and keeping families happy on the hill13) For lessons, arrive early, preferably the day prior to get rentals if needed, ( or get Doorstep Skis to deliver them :-)), to get tickets in hand and hopefully avoid lines during peak season. It is great to let your children—especially if they are very young (3-6 years)—know where they are going and what will take place throughout the day, to reassure them.

12) Read on..

Thursday, July 7, 2016

Salomon 2016/2017

Check out the new QST line up fromSAlomon for next season. Winning awards left right and centres.. Read on

Saturday, July 2, 2016

7 Surprising Facts About Ski Injuries

  • The average skier death in CO is a thirty-seven years old experienced male skier wearing a helmet who loses control on an intermediate, groomed run and hits a tree.
  • The majority of deaths — 54 percent — occurred on blue, groomed runs, while 31 percent were on expert trails.
  • The increase in the number of people who wear helmets hasn’t resulted in fewer fatalities. Helmets are designed to protect riders at about 12 mph, while a skier or snowboarder who collides with a tree or another rider is typically going 25 to 40 mph.
  • More than 80 percent of ski deaths in Colorado are men.
  • Last season, 54 skiers and snowboarders died at ski areas within the U.S., which saw a total of 51 million ski visits, according to the National Ski Areas Association.
  • Researchers at Johns Hopkins recently estimated that about 600,000 people nationally are injured each year as a result of skiing and snowboarding.
  • Estimates are that about two injuries occur per 1,000 skier visits  — a decrease of 50 percent since the mid-1970s.
  • Tuesday, June 28, 2016

    3 reasons why Brexit won't affect your ski holiday in France this winter



    Thanks to Alikats Mountain holidays ;

    Regardless of which way you voted, the events of 23rd & 24th June are huge & the resulting uncertainty will be the hardest thing for many people over the coming months. However, the impending political divorce between the UK and Europe won't really affect your ski holiday this winter and here's why:
    1. The Euro and the British pound are fairly well correlated in this scenario. By that I mean, that the uncertainty affecting the strength of the pound is also affecting the Euro in almost equal measures and is likely to continue that way & therefore the exchange rate betweeen the 2 currencies is unlikely to be subjected to moves that we have seen between GBP and USD. For example, the GBP-EUR exchange rate has been between 1.25 - 1.28 for most of June (with the exception of the last few days before the referendum when the markets started to bet on a 'Remain' outcome). Following the result, the rate has moved to 1.23 over the weekend, a move of between 1.5-3.8%.
    2. Your travel to France will be the same as it's always been. Your EU passport will still allow you to travel freely to France, without the need for a visa or a stamp, & your EHIC insurnace card will still provide access to healthcare. This won't change before the end of next winter, if at all.
    3. Although Brexit is a BIG deal that will affect us all in many different ways, the one thing we can say for sure it will not affect is the weather. The snow WILL keep falling!

    Sunday, April 10, 2016

    SPRING SKIING

    Spring Skiing header
    By The Snow+Rock Team.

    Spring skiing is one of the many pleasures of the ski season. Warm days, blue skies and sunshine. It is like the reward for enduring the cold windy weather in the heart of winter.
    With the change in weather comes a change in conditions and for the best experience on the snow you need to adapt the way you approach your skiing and how your equipment is tuned.