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Showing posts from July, 2016

What Type of Rider Are You?

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People say you are what you eat, but what do they know? As any self-respecting snowboarder will tell you, it’s all about what you ride, duuuude. Style is everything. But which style? What board should you buy? What brands should you wear to be cool? These are the really important questions you’ll need to answer. To help you,  Whitelines  has compiled this handy quiz that’ll tell you what kind of rider – nay, what kind of person – you are.  Read on  and all will be revealed...

Skiing The Portes Du Soleil Circuit

The Portes du Soleil is one of the largest ski areas in the world with over 650km of marked pistes encompassing twelve resorts. It stretches between Mont Blanc and Lake Geneva, which creates a microclimate that is excellent for snowfall. Jean Vuarnet was responsible for developing Avoriaz and then linking it to the surrounding resorts creating the Portes du Soleil ski area. The highest point in the area is 2466m and the lowest is at 1000m and there are more than 200 lifts linking the area, which stretches over 14 valleys. Luckily, for skiers and snowboarders who are keen to explore, most of the Portes du Soleil ski area can be reached in a single circuit. The circuit will take most average skiers and snowboarders a whole day to complete so first lifts are advised! There are two directions the circuit can be skied; clockwise or counterclockwise. Completing the circuit counterclockwise could mean challenging La Chavanette otherwise known as The Swiss Wall or facing the getting the ch

Who Invented Snowboarding?

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Who Invented Snowboarding? Not Jake Burton By Michael Frank, Adventure Journal on June 7th, 2012 On Christmas Day, 1965, Muskegon, Michigan’s Sherman Poppen’s pregnant wife, Nancy, wanted their two daughters, Wendy and Laurie, to play outside so she could get some rest. When the girls were disappointed they couldn’t safely stand up in their sled to go down the snow-covered dunes in their backyard, Poppen fastened together a pair of kid’s skis and after some tweaking invented Muskegon’s most famous toy, the Snurfer. The rest, as they say, is history. By 1968 Muskegon was hosting the World Snurfing Classic, and Poppen licensed the Snurfer name to Brunswick, which sold over a million of the proto-snowboards by the early 1980s. And even though Poppen didn’t actually bother to take up snowboarding until he was in his late 60s, he’s still considered the father of the sport, honored by the Olympic Committee when snowboarding was inducted into the Games. Poppen is being honored by the Musk

13 Tips for Skiing with Kids

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13 Tips for  Skiing with Kids Top kids' instructors share wisdom on making skiing fun for everyone in the family. 13)  For lessons, arrive early, preferably the day prior to get rentals if needed, ( or get Doorstep Skis to deliver them :-)), to get tickets in hand and hopefully avoid lines during peak season. It is great to let your children—especially if they are very young (3-6 years)—know where they are going and what will take place throughout the day, to reassure them. 12)  Read on..

Salomon 2016/2017

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Check out the new QST line up fromSAlomon for next season. Winning awards left right and centres..  Read on

7 Surprising Facts About Ski Injuries

The average skier death in CO is a thirty-seven years old experienced male skier wearing a helmet who loses control on an intermediate, groomed run   and hits a tree. The majority of deaths — 54 percent — occurred on blue, groomed runs, while 31 percent were on expert trails. The increase in the number of people who wear helmets hasn’t resulted in fewer fatalities. Helmets are designed to protect riders at about 12 mph, while a skier or snowboarder who collides with a tree or another rider is typically going 25 to 40 mph. More than 80 percent of ski deaths in Colorado are men. Last season, 54 skiers and snowboarders died at ski areas within the U.S., which saw a total of 51 million ski visits, according to the National Ski Areas Association. Researchers at Johns Hopkins recently estimated that about 600,000 people nationally are injured each year as a result of skiing and snowboarding. Estimates are that about two injuries occur per 1,000 skier visits  — a decrease of 50 percent