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Showing posts from January, 2016

The Environmental Impact of Making Snow

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Coutesy of —Mary Catherine O'Connor @outsideonline.com Pointing to the sacredness of the San Francisco Peaks north of Flagstaff, Arizona, a coalition of Native American tribes has been fighting the development and expansion of Arizona Snowbowl ski resort since 1979. It remains defiant, reports the New York Times, despite having suffered a key legal defeat this winter. A federal court ruled against the tribes in a nearly decade-old lawsuit that claims the ski resort's plans to use treated wastewater from Flagstaff's sewage system to make artificial snow for the resort would interfere with religious practices and mar the mountains. 
Wait. The resort will use sewage to make snow? Technically, yes. That's why the story has garnered lots of attention. But recycling treated wastewater for applications that do not require potable water is not nearly as icky, nor as uncommon, as it might sound. This type of water is commonly used for irrigating golf courses and soccer fields, f…

7 Surprising Facts About Ski Injuries

The average skier death in CO is a thirty-seven years old experienced male skier wearing a helmet who loses control on an intermediate, groomed runand hits a tree.The majority of deaths — 54 percent — occurred on blue, groomed runs, while 31 percent were on expert trails.The increase in the number of people who wear helmets hasn’t resulted in fewer fatalities. Helmets are designed to protect riders at about 12 mph, while a skier or snowboarder who collides with a tree or another rider is typically going 25 to 40 mph.More than 80 percent of ski deaths in Colorado are men.Last season, 54 skiers and snowboarders died at ski areas within the U.S., which saw a total of 51 million ski visits, according to the National Ski Areas Association.Researchers at Johns Hopkins recently estimated that about 600,000 people nationally are injured each year as a result of skiing and snowboarding.Estimates are that about two injuries occur per 1,000 skier visits  — a decrease of 50 percent since the mid-…

DO NOT Use a Smart Phone App as an Avalanche Beacon!

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The Canadian Avalanche Center has just released a press release denouncing the use of “smart phone apps” as avalanche beacon.  

3 European smart phone apps are offering service as avalanche beacons now and they have been found to NOT WORK.  When you are running out of air underneath an avalanche, you won’t feel that great about having saved $300 bucks by using a smart phone app instead of a real, certified avalanche beacon.

A smart phone app will never replace your avalanche beacon.  There are so many reasons that an app cannot replace an avalanche beacon:  they don’t work properly, battery life, robustness, reliability and interference.  Please get an proper avalanche beacon and learn how to use it.

Please read the Canadian Avalanche Center’s press release:
Canadian Avalanche Centre Warns Backcountry Users About New Smartphone Apps Apps marketed as transceivers give users false sense of protection Oct 24, 2013, Revelstoke, BC:   Smartphone avalanche search applications that are marketed as…

23 Ways To Make A Chairlift Ride Incredibly Awkward

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Lift rides can be pretty uncomfortable. Here's some hints on how to make them even more so!

Ski resort chairlift queues are usually buzzing with joy, laughter and unadulterated hatred. It’s one the strangest vibes on the mountain.

The fact that everyone is slowly trying to edge in front of one another means that all civility is either false or non-existent.
And the communal rage directed at anyone who does manage to skip the queue is only matched by the awkwardness felt when you end up on a lift with a silent stranger.

Of course, more often than not the rider you’re seated with is nice enough, easy to chat to and turns out to be pretty cool.
Other times, though, they just stay silent and refuse to talk. If you’re feeling like a bit of dick when that next happens, here are 23 things you can do or say to make that ride incredibly awkward…


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Why do you get cramping and burning under my arches?

6 days ago by in Gear Tagged: , ,
Janine Winter from Profeet answers your ski boot questions. by  Question: Often when skiing I get a cramping and burning under the arches of my foot. Is it the boots?Answer: Multiple factors could contribute to a cramping and burning sensation under the arch and yes, one of those could be that you are in the wrong boot. Initially it is important to check the size to ensure the boot is not too big or too small. Typically, when the boot is too big you end up clawing your feet to try and secure yourself in the boot and gain control of the ski, which will often cause cramping. Likewise, if the boot is too small, it will cause crushing and a lack of circulation to the foot. Once size and shape of the boot have been eliminated, we would need to check the foot is stabilised in the boot. All ski boots come with a flat piece of foam in the bottom, which doesn’t offer support in the arch. It is …

What Type of Rider Are You?

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People say you are what you eat, but what do they know? As any self-respecting snowboarder will tell you, it’s all about what you ride, duuuude. Style is everything. But which style? What board should you buy? What brands should you wear to be cool? These are the really important questions you’ll need to answer. To help you, Whitelines has compiled this handy quiz that’ll tell you what kind of rider – nay, what kind of person – you are. Read on and all will be revealed...