Posts

Showing posts from December, 2015

The 20 Most Notorious Snowboarding Criminals

Image
What kind of legal trouble have snowboarders got themselves into over the years?Illicit Snowboardinglined-up a veritable rogue’s gallery of snowboarding miscreants who have run afoul of the law for a range of criminal misdeeds…
First up its snowboarding’s version of Point Break...
The Snowboard Bandits.......Read On

How to Ski Better on Pistes

Image
Ski Technique: How to Ski Better on Pistesby Welove2ski
There are few better places to boost your ski technique than on the groomed pistes of Morzine, France.

Welove2sk.comi give  some tips on how to ski these slopes more smoothly. We whittled the list down to four key points to think about while you’re carving:
1. Stay Centred Over Your Skis Your weight needs to be evenly distributed right along the length of your feet, which means you’ll be able to maintain downward pressure right along the full length of your skis. Don’t lean back.

RIGHT
WRONG 2. Even Up the Weight Distribution Between Your FeetRead on...

The evolution of carving (and how to do it right)

Image
The evolution of carving (and how to do it right)Courtesy of  The Fall-Line Blog
The first carver, built 68 years ago with a 52mm waist, didn’t catch on. But the radical race models of the 1990s paved the way for today’s skis, as Ross Green relates Every now and then the ski industry creates some new technology which leaves everyone wondering why it hadn’t been thought of before. Carving skis have a bit of a surprising history, sitting on designers’ shelves for many years before finally getting the green light for production. In 1994, I was sponsored by Kneissl and they gave me a pair of Ergo skis. At the time they looked ridiculous, with a tail so fat that they looked like a set of flippers. I felt quite unsure about using them and remember standing in the lift queues in Val d’Isère being mocked by racers on a daily basis. They weren’t laughing once they saw how fast I was going!
The history of carving skis dates back to 1948 when a couple of guys in Winter Park tried to make…

Plight of skiing’s homemade lunch

Image
by:  I find temporary solace in my homemade sandwich—it’s simple, effective, and even tricks me into thinking I’m not spending my life savings on a day pass. So when an attendant at a resort’s mid-mountain lodge told me my lunchtime masterpiece wasn’t welcome on premises, I was a bit—how should I put this—pissed.  The Lunch Enforcer at Crystal Mountain, Washington, continued tickling rage receptors by informing me that not only was my bagged lunch not welcome at the mid-mountain hut, but also not on the top two floors of the base lodge, at least from 11 a.m. to 1 p.m., when lunch hours are enforced. Graciously, the mountain would, however, let me eat my meal in a basement locker room. A brown bagger for life, I had become a ski area outcast, my scarlet letter written in gooey raspberry jelly. So, uh, what the eff guys? With more resorts jumping on the bandwagon, I have to wonder when packing a lunch turned into a badge of social inferiority.
The brown bag has been a part of…

23 Ways To Make A Chairlift Ride Incredibly Awkward

Image
Lift rides can be pretty uncomfortable. Here's some hints on how to make them even more so!

Ski resort chairlift queues are usually buzzing with joy, laughter and unadulterated hatred. It’s one the strangest vibes on the mountain.

The fact that everyone is slowly trying to edge in front of one another means that all civility is either false or non-existent.
And the communal rage directed at anyone who does manage to skip the queue is only matched by the awkwardness felt when you end up on a lift with a silent stranger.

Of course, more often than not the rider you’re seated with is nice enough, easy to chat to and turns out to be pretty cool.
Other times, though, they just stay silent and refuse to talk. If you’re feeling like a bit of dick when that next happens, here are 23 things you can do or say to make that ride incredibly awkward…


Read more ...

Who Invented Snowboarding?

Image
Who Invented Snowboarding? Not Jake BurtonBy Michael Frank, Adventure Journal on June 7th, 2012
On Christmas Day, 1965, Muskegon, Michigan’s Sherman Poppen’s pregnant wife, Nancy, wanted their two daughters, Wendy and Laurie, to play outside so she could get some rest. When the girls were disappointed they couldn’t safely stand up in their sled to go down the snow-covered dunes in their backyard, Poppen fastened together a pair of kid’s skis and after some tweaking invented Muskegon’s most famous toy, the Snurfer. The rest, as they say, is history. By 1968 Muskegon was hosting the World Snurfing Classic, and Poppen licensed the Snurfer name to Brunswick, which sold over a million of the proto-snowboards by the early 1980s. And even though Poppen didn’t actually bother to take up snowboarding until he was in his late 60s, he’s still considered the father of the sport, honored by the Olympic Committee when snowboarding was inducted into the Games. Poppen is being honored by the Muskegon…

Skiing The Portes Du Soleil Circuit

The Portes du Soleil is one of the largest ski areas in the world with over 650km of marked pistes encompassing twelve resorts. It stretches between Mont Blanc and Lake Geneva, which creates a microclimate that is excellent for snowfall. Jean Vuarnet was responsible for developing Avoriaz and then linking it to the surrounding resorts creating the Portes du Soleil ski area. The highest point in the area is 2466m and the lowest is at 1000m and there are more than 200 lifts linking the area, which stretches over 14 valleys. Luckily, for skiers and snowboarders who are keen to explore, most of the Portes du Soleil ski area can be reached in a single circuit. The circuit will take most average skiers and snowboarders a whole day to complete so first lifts are advised!

There are two directions the circuit can be skied; clockwise or counterclockwise. Completing the circuit counterclockwise could mean challenging La Chavanette otherwise known as The Swiss Wall or facing the getting the chair…

PDS- still best value ski pass!

Image
Each year Source Magazine Morzine like to compare our own Portes du Soleil lift pass prices with those of Europe’s other large ski areas. This always prompts loads of debate over whether the Portes du Soleil can be called a truly ‘linked’ ski area, but that’s really not the purpose of their comparison. 650km of piste (regardless of the ‘linked’ debate) are available to ski with one lift pass, and that’s the basis of our price comparison. The Portes du Soleil 2016 lift pass is still the best value big area ski pass in Europe. With 650km of piste available for €247.50 per adult for a 6 day standard lift pass, it costs you just €0.38 per kilometre to ski in the Portes du Soleil. Click here to see how the other big ski areas break down…